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Voici des événements d'intérêt pour nos membres ou autres personnes préoccupées par la biodiversité, la culture de variétés du patrimoine, la culture biologique ainsi que les semences. Si vous savez d'autres événements, SVP courriel

Seeds of Diversity 20th Annual AGM

Dimanche 15 Novembre 2015          1 pm to 3:30
Waterloo Region Museum, 10 Huron Rd.
Kitchener, ON

Join board, staff and other members at our Annual AGM, this year being held in Kitchener. All are welcome, and Seeds of Diversity members get in free. Otherwise, admission $5.

Enjoy bidding on our many silent auction items, great for Christmas gifts! Or gifting to yourself! They range from free admissions, to seed kits, to restaurant and store certificates and baskets. Thanks to sponsors Best Western Plus Kitchener, Herrle's Country Farm Market, Pfennings Organic and More, Waterloo Region Museum-Doon Heritage Village, Fertile Ground CSA, Hawthorn Farm Organic Seeds, Urban Tomato Seeds, Cottage Gardener Seeds, and Nith Valley Apiary.

As a special bonus, you are welcome to tour the galleries before or after the meeting. The permanent exhibit showcases who we are-tracing the 12,000 year human history of Waterloo Region, from First Nation's peoples, to European settlement, to the high tech sector boom of recent years. The special exhibit is on the history of beer! See for details.

Special guest speaker is well-known garden writer Lorraine Johnson. You may buy an autographed copy of her book "City Farmer".
Lorraine's Bio: In the more than 15 years that Lorraine has been writing books and articles, she has become known for her unconventional outlook on the world of gardening. Advocating for organics in the days when synthetic chemicals ruled, writing about native plants before most people had heard the term, promoting community gardening when politicians were wary of involving people in parks, profiling guerrilla gardens when the idea still sounded vaguely dangerous, Lorraine has always written about marginal subjects on their way to becoming mainstream.

Not easily pigeon-holed, her work is often about the surprising corners where the impulse to nurture and sustain growth intersects with the human need to cultivate meaningful connections—with the earth and with each other. She views gardening as a strenuous conversation with the planet—indeed, as one of the most transformative ways to find our place in the world and what we want that world to be. She’s not afraid to include failures (her own, our own), along with hopes and dreams, in that conversation.

Lorraine’s writing career follows her passionate interests, and her more than 10 published books have covered a broad range of topics—from com- posting and native plant gardening to censorship and travel. Unabashedly an advocate, she has been promoting urban food production for decades not only in her writing but in her involvement with numerous community groups and organizations such as the Toronto Community Garden Network, Toronto Botanic Garden, the American Community Gardening Association, and others.
Lorraine lives in Toronto in a barn-shaped house with three chickens and two cats—and dreams of including a dwarf goat in her backyard.